Friday, October 24, 2014

Product spotlight for October


Here here you go, You have been asking for a full copper still and here it is. We bring you a 30 gallon copper pot that will accept our HS5500 Watt heating system that is world renowned by the way. It has an 8" man-way for cleaning and a 1.5 inch drain on the bottom. It comes with a stand so if you would like to use open flame heat then that is not problem either. All seams on the pot are TIG welded for a lifetime of service.. We can add any option you like to this kettle but there will be charges for added options. Your gonna love this ole girl
Make sure you select the no. of plates you would like. 
Many of our customers just rave about the craftsman ship of this system. It is all American Made right here in Ky.

THIS ITEM WILL BE SHIPPED VIA FREIGHT 
Features
  • You get
    1. 30 gallon all copper pot
    2. HS5500 Heating system
    3. Hillbilly Flute column

Calling All Preppers

To be properly Prepared for what ever catastrophe  that is going to hit our country you need to be able to make fuel and alcohol for medicine. You may also need an accessional drink to deal with what your facing.


SHTF Prepping

Why should distillation equipment be added to your prepper equipment checklist? Here are 3 excellent reasons, to name a few: distilled spirits, fuel alcohol, and antiseptic. These goods would be highly valuable during a SHTF event and can all be easily manufactured with simple, small-scale distillation equipment. As a bonus, all of these goods would be highly desirable in a barter economy.

Fuel

Fuel is included on many, if not all survival prep lists. Here are a few things to keep in mind on this topic: first, that there are many types of fuel and the different types have different uses. Second, a good fuel strategy is one that provides fuel based on expected need as well as one that provides provisions for replenishment. We’ll address all of these issues below.
The two primary fuel categories are stationary and mobile. Here are examples to help clarify. Wood and coal are both stationary fuels and are appropriate for heating and cooking, in a set location. Gasoline and diesel are mobile fuels and are appropriate for powering mobile equipment such as a cars, motorcycles, and tractors.
Some fuels can be used as stationary and mobile fuels while others cannot be or at least should not be. For example, wood is great for heating and cooking but it’s useless as a mobile fuel. Gasoline, a mobile fuel, will power a small engine, but it’s not the best for cooking, and relying on it as a long term heating strategy would be very unwise considering the amount of fuel that one would need to keep on hand.
Finally, mobile fuels such as gasoline, diesel, and kerosene have limited shelf lives and will be subject to supply issues during instances of widespread infrastructure meltdowns.
Considering the abovementioned facts, one potential fuel supply strategy would involve a good stockpile of wood and relative close proximity to a source for more, as well as a renewable mobile fuel source. Because the mobile fuels listed above will be subject to supply limitations and producing them will be very difficult, if not impossible, we cannot recommend them. Natural gas and propane could also be used as mobile (and stationary fuels), but they’re subject to the same limitations as the others. Fortunately, there is a mobile fuel that is quite easy to produce, keeps well, and doubles as a mobile as well as a stationary fuel: alcohol.
To use alcohol as a fuel in a small engine, it must be 90% pure. This is an issue, albeit only a small one, as fuel alcohol produced by means of distillation maxes out at a purity of 95%. Re-distilling will not result in a higher proof product. To remove the last bit of water from the fuel, it must treated with a drying agent. Fortunately, corn grits actually work very well to accomplish this.
Fuel alcohol can be produced in any still but column stills are the most appropriate for this task, as they’re more efficient at making the high alcohol contented need for use in engines.  Though, considering that there are many uses for alcohol, all requiring different proofs, the best still for a prepare would be a  reflux still for fuel alcohol, or can be left empty for making whiskey, antiseptic, and distilled water. This tip of still can be very versitile.

Monday, October 13, 2014

Legalization of Home Distilling

There is still movement in the Legalizing of Home Distillation.  My son Matt is in contact weekly with senators and Representatives on this topic. He has Been to DC recently and met with some of our Senators.
 National Geographic is about to  produce a documentary on home distilling. Hopefully this will shed some light on our hobby distilling and help to get legalization moving forward. We don't know the date on the airing of this documentary.  We will post this when we find out.

Friday, August 29, 2014

100% Malt all grain wihiskey moonshing

Here is a recipe that is very good and I think most of you can do this at home.

I like to do this recipe 40 lbs (18kg) of malt at a time, for a couple reasons. 1) 15 gallons of strike water for mashing fits perfect in a half barrel (15.5g) keggle. 2) It gives 2 - 10 gallon runs, perfect for a half barrel still.
  I run it with 100% Red Wheat malt, but the recipe will work identically for a 100% Barley Malt AG whiskey.

Ingredients:

14 gallons water (plus 8 gallons water at yeast pitch time)

1 gallon backset (I freeze 1/2 gallon in zip-lock bags for this purpose) 

4 tsp gypsum

40 pounds milled Wheat or Barley Malt



Mashing and Fermenting:

Bring the water (14g), backset and gypsum to 160 degrees F  (strike temp).
Put 20 lbs  milled malt in each of 2 20 gallon  fermenters, or all 40 lbs in a bigger barrel if you have a 30+ gallon barrel.
Stir in half the water into each fermenter (7.5g) Temp should settle at 148F Put the lids loosely on, and wrap the barrels up tight in blankets to hold the mash temp. Stir every 30 minutes.
After a couple hours remove the blankets and point a fan at the barrels, it helps cool them much faster to pitch temp.
When the temp is below 80F, add 4 more gallons water per barrel, and take a large spoon or mash paddle and whip the mash up to a froth to aerate it well.
Pitch your favorite yeast. We recommend PrestigeWhiskey pure with AG. (Ferment on the grain) This will ferment to .990 (Dry) and taste great.



Distilling:
 For a pot still after its done fermenting (1-2 weeks depending on temp)
Pull 5 gallons of the clear liquid off the top of each barrel, for a 10 gallon stripping run. (save and freeze the backset after distilling in zip-locks for next time. Combine the 2 stripping runs and do a slower spirit run.
Make your cuts to taste and age on oak as long as you can keep your hands off it.




Yield from 40 lbs  malt is about 2.6 gallons (10l) 60% (avg) before cuts. Do your cuts to your taste preference. You should get 1.4 gallons 67%, after cuts. 

We hope you like this and enjoy.

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

HBS Copper

We have started a new division of Hillbilly Stills.  The name of this division is HBS Copper. It is dedicated to all american made distillation equipment. We are building very heavy commercial copper stills in the range of 250 gallon and below. We are currently investigating adding steam heat to our  copper stills
 We are committed to bringing back american jobs to our community.  We can build anything the customer wants, from an old traditional pot still, to new technology columns stills. From Whiskey stills to Vodka stills, we can build it.
 We will be having product highlights coming soon. Please feel free to give us a call if you have any questions about our products.

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Product Highlight: 2.5 Gallon Charred Oak Barrels


charred white oak barrel
Whether you’re a DIY distiller, brewer, or run a professional distillery or winery, there’s no denying that aging your concoction in a charred oak barrel gives its taste an extra bit of flair.  For centuries, the oak tree has produced the preferred wood necessary to stave off oxidation, soften wine tannins, ferment various brews, and age spirits to perfection. 

Whether for fermentation, aging, or simple storage, our 2.5 gallon charred white oak barrel is more than functional; it’s an eye-catching conversation piece designed to enhance your man cave, wine cellar, bar area, or patio deck in a way that no mini fridge or keg could ever do. 

Each oak barrel includes:
  • A matching wooden stand
  • A bung & spigot
  • A storing tablet
  • Between 4 and 6 hoops
  • 2.5 gallons of volume – that’s a lot of room!

About the Author: Hillbilly Stills has the best online selection of handmade, high-quality DIY distilling equipment, fermenting chemicals, copper stills, and other distilling accessories anywhere on the web.  Shop their online store today and be drinking your own brew, wine, or spirits in short order by visiting www.hillbillystills.com.

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Oak Barrels and the Aging Process

oak barrels

For literally thousands of years, wooden barrels have been used to store, transport, age, and flavor alcoholic beverages of all types. From beer to wine to spirits, humans have relied on barrel aging to give their alcohol that last bit of perfection. However, the purpose of using wood barrels wasn’t for aging in the beginning, but more for storage, and the idea of barrel aging for taste was an unexpected result.

Long ago in ancient Mesopotamia, people used palm wood to fashion barrels used to store alcohol. However, palm wood is difficult to bend into barrels, and by the time the Roman Empire had come to fruition, the use of oak barrels had become the most prevalent form of storage.

Regardless of the type of alcohol stored, distillers soon realized that oak barrel aging made their beverages less harsh, better tasting, and added individuality to their particular process.

What is it About Oak Barrels?

Because oak is a relatively porous wood, it allows for a certain amount of evaporation and oxygenation, but not to the extent that oxidation (the same process that causes rust to form on metals) or spoiling occurs.

When a certain amount of evaporation is allowed, some alcohol and water is removed, leaving more of the natural taste of the liquid behind. In the case of wine aging, the small bit of oxygen that makes into the barrel acts upon the tannins in the wine, making it softer to ingest and giving it a more pleasurable taste overall.

Alcohol can be fermented in oak barrels, or it can be aged in oak barrels after fermentation. There is an important distinction to be made between the two processes, particularly that alcohol which is fermented and then aged in the oak will take on more of the taste characteristics of the wood than if it were just fermented in it.

The effects of oak on alcohol are exceptionally prevalent when working with wine as the phenols in the oak produce a chemical reaction that gives the wine a bit of vanilla flavor and/or extra sweetness. The amount of char on a barrel also affects the tannin levels, and the ellagitannins in wood provide an extra layer of protection against oxidation and reduction.

About the Author: Hillbilly Stills is a company made up of hillbillies who have a love for all things distilling and ingesting alcoholic beverages. They specialize in DIY distilling for the home brewer, as well as equipment and accessories for bigger operations. Whether you’re a regular guy who wants a new hobby or to drink for less, or you’re running a retail distillery, Hillbilly Stills has all the distilling tools, guides, and equipment you need to make it happen. Visit www.hillbillystills.com today to view and purchase their products!